Make Your Day and Get Out of Your Way!

Sometimes we need to get out of our own way and take a chance. However, fear of failure, of being laughed at, not liked, thought badly of, can prevent us from pushing ourselves into the unknown and stop us from gradually moving forward into developing new skills, abilities and life experiences.It can lead us to resist offers to try out new places and things, to have a go or speak at an event, due to fear or concern at what might happen. We may second-guess ourselves, run a ‘what if’ narrative. Perhaps we’re unsure as to what to say or do, are hesitant at risking looking ridiculous or apprehensive about being embarrassed.But others also share those fears and concerns and it can inspire and encourage them to have a go when they see someone else taking a chance, refusing to get in their own way and not stress too much about the potential consequences.Others are often appreciative and supportive of those who try, so why not instead decide to take a few positive steps, stop hi-jacking ourselves and enjoy the opportunity to move out of our comfort zone!- Start small. By taking one step at a time, you gradually build up your confidence. If you have social anxiety, instead of agreeing to go for dinner at a buzzing, ultra-smart restaurant why not first get used to going out for coffees and lunches at busy times of the day? Choose positive ways to take things at your own pace, make your day and get out of your way!- Get used to mixing with a variety of people and going out. If you’ve a meeting, interview or presentation, practice pulling together a few bullet points and rehearse in front of a mirror or with a small, supportive audience. Focus on the areas you feel unsure about.- Be aware of how you talk to yourself. We’re often our own worst critic, berating ourselves in ways we’d never dream of speaking to others. Instead, tell yourself that you can do it, it’s worth it, that others are not as interested or invested in what you do as you are; all ways to help in moving past any initial doubts and hesitancy.- Address areas that feel neglected, that are in need of a little help. Use this opportunity as the motivation to improve your appearance, your wardrobe, update your image, benefit your conversational skills or education. It might require a little effort, but that commitment will be repaid by enhancing your life and making you feel more invested in the quality of your day-to-day engagements.- Keep up-to-date with local news and popular TV shows, so enabling you to find it relatively easy to join conversations and connect with others. Or ask people ‘tame’ questions about their holidays or how they spend their time; fairly safe approaches to starting conversations.- Enlist the help of a supportive friend, family member, therapist, coach or mentor, someone who’s on your side and will champion you along, sometimes applauding your efforts, sometimes giving you a nudge to keep going. Be open to that happening and appreciate constructive feedback and suggestions. It can be surprising to discover how differently others see us, compared to how we see ourselves.- Nurture a curious, interested mindset by doing something new and challenging every day, so making you think and step out of your comfort zone. It may be simply travelling a different route to work, cooking something you’ve never tried before for dinner. Think about ways you can fire up a positive, interesting and engaged approach to life and relish where it takes you.- Value opportunities to say ‘yes’ to invitations and try new experiences and relationships. Even agreeing to do things that may not initially appeal can lead to unexpected successes and adventures. And sometimes using ‘no’ can be positive too, if it stops you from becoming overwhelmed and exhausted.When we get out of our own way, we stop thinking about how other people perceive us, or of ways to keep them happy. We move beyond looking for the easy options in life or justifying ways to not do things. Going with the flow allows us to live in the moment and be enthusiastic about having a go. When you get out of your way you can make your day!

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Secondhand Smoke – The Silent Killer Incognito

The health hazards of exposure to secondhand smoke are well recognized by experts in the healthcare field. Secondhand smoke is that environmental tobacco smoke resulting from burning tobacco. There are two forms of secondhand smoke, mainstream smoke and side stream smoke. Mainstream smoke is that which is exhaled by a smoker. Side stream smoke is the smoke which streams directly from the burning tobacco product. Either form unfortunately is harmful to innocent individuals who involuntarily engage in passive smoking as a result of it the tobacco pollution caused by the willful smoker.

If it were not bad enough that nicotine which is a powerfully addictive substance with harmful health effects is present in secondhand smoke, tobacco also produces more than 4000 chemicals of which 250 are toxic. Worse yet, 50 of the chemicals in secondhand smoke are felt to be carcinogenic or cancer-causing. Some of those carcinogenic chemicals are as follows:

o Benzene — A component of gasoline

o Formaldehyde — A chemical used for embalming corpses

o Hydrogen cyanide — A highly poisonous gas used in chemical weapons

o Carbon monoxide – An important gas comprising automobile exhaust

The Surgeon General issued a report in 2006 concluding that secondhand tobacco smoke can kill and that there is no safe amount of secondhand smoke. The report also concluded that the greater the degree of secondhand smoke exposure the greater the health risks.

Some alarming statistics relating to secondhand or passive smoke exposure are as follows:

o In the United States alone 126 million people who don’t smoke are exposed to passive smoke at home and/or at work.

o In the United States 50,000 people per year die because of secondhand smoke exposure.

o In the United States approximately 3000 deaths per year occur because of lung disease in non-smokers caused by passive smoking.

o Exposure to passive smoke increases non-smokers’ risk of developing lung cancer by between 20% and 30% and their risk of developing heart disease by 25% to 30%.

o Exposure to passive smoke results in the development of respiratory conditions such as pneumonia and bronchitis in between 150,000 and 300,000 children under the age of 18 months, of which between 7,500 and 15,000 require hospitalization.

o More than 40% of children who require visits to emergency rooms for severe asthma attacks live in homes where smoking occurs.

Given these alarming facts and statistics about the harmful effects of exposure to secondhand smoke, it is important to determine your degree of exposure if you are a non-smoker in a home where someone smokes or if you are possibly exposed to passive smoke in the workplace.

Thanks to an instant result quantitative nicotine test kit that can be used in the home, it is now possible to determine not only if you are exposed to secondhand smoke, but also your degree of exposure. There is also a quantitative test kit designed for professional use. Each kit comes in two types. One requires the use of a urine specimen for testing. The other uses saliva.

By determining your level of environmental tobacco exposure you can then act accordingly to address one of life’s serious health hazards.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purpose only and is not intended to be a substitute for medical consultation with a qualified professional. The author encourages Internet users to be careful when using medical information obtained from the Internet and to consult your doctor before make decisions that can affect your health or if you are unsure about your medical condition.

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